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Hum Mol Genet. 2006 Mar 1;15(5):797-805. Epub 2006 Jan 24.

ABCB1/MDR1 gene determines susceptibility and phenotype in ulcerative colitis: discrimination of critical variants using a gene-wide haplotype tagging approach.

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  • 1Molecular Medicine Unit and Gastrointestinal Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK. gwotzerho@aol.com

Abstract

Several lines of evidence suggest a role for the multidrug resistance gene (ABCB1/MDR1) and its product, P-glycoprotein 170, in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, P-glycoprotein activity determines bioavailability of many drugs used regularly in many medical specialties, and ABCB/MDR1 variation appears to be a critical pharmacogenetic determinant. We have utilized a gene-wide haplotype tagging approach to further define the identity of germ-line variations in the ABCB1/MDR1 gene contributing to IBD susceptibility. Six haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) representing the haplotypic variations of the ABCB1/MDR1 gene were identified initially following the characterization of the haplotype structure of this gene in 24 Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain Caucasian trios. Genotyping was performed in 249 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 179 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 260 healthy controls. Using log-likelihood analysis, we observed a highly significant association between the common haplotypes and UC (P=4.22 x 10(-7)) but not CD (P=0.22). This significant association was critically dependent on one tSNP, intronic variant rs3789243. All haplotypes with this variant retained a highly significant association (P=3.2 x 10(-7)-3.6 x 10(-12)), whereas significance was lost when rs3789243 was dropped in systematic haplotypic analysis. The effect of this tSNP was independent of C3435T SNP, previously suggested to be the critical variant in disease susceptibility and drug transport. The association with UC was shown to be strongest with the phenotype of extensive disease (P=1.7 x 10(-7)). This 'candidate gene' approach provides compelling evidence to support the contribution of the ABCB1/MDR1 gene in determining risk to UC but not to CD and provides new insights into the localization of the critical susceptibility determinants within the gene. In addition, these findings have potentially important implications in the application of pharmacogenetics across a range of common diseases, including HIV, epilepsy and colorectal cancer.

PMID:
16434479
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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