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J Affect Disord. 2006 Mar;91(1):27-32. Epub 2006 Jan 20.

Burden of phase-specific sexual dysfunction with SSRIs.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatric Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. ahc8v@virginia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examines phase-specific sexual dysfunction among patients who are being treated for major depression and who do not meet criteria for global sexual dysfunction.

METHODS:

6297 adult outpatients receiving antidepressant monotherapy completed the Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ). The sub-sample for this study (n = 3114) comprises participants who were receiving treatment with a SSRI or SNRI and did not meet the gender-specific criterion for global sexual dysfunction on the CSFQ.

RESULTS:

Among this sub-sample, 95.6% of women and 97.9% of men exhibited impairment in at least one phase of sexual functioning. Men were significantly more likely than women to experience dysfunction in the desire phase (91.2% vs. 79.0%; OR = 2.76; 95% C.I. = 2.14 to 3.5) and the orgasmic phase (85.1% vs. 45.4%; OR = 6.9; 95% C.I. = 5.6 to 8.4) but were significantly less likely than women to experience dysfunction in the arousal phase (71.9% vs. 83.3%; OR = .51; 95% C.I. = .43 to .62). The prevalence of phase-specific dysfunction did not vary significantly by SSRI/SNRI for males or females.

CONCLUSION:

Among patients who do not experience clinically significant global sexual dysfunction on SSRI/SNRI monotherapy, dysfunction in at least one phase of the sexual response cycle is very common and may reduce sexual health-related quality of life.

PMID:
16430968
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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