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Obes Surg. 2006 Jan;16(1):39-44.

Is collagen a good banding material for outlet control of vertical gastroplasty? Preliminary study in pigs.

Author information

  • 1Digestive Surgery Center, Montpellier Hospital, France, and Weill College of Medicine of Cornell University, New York, USA. d.nocca@wanadoo.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To maintain the long-term effects of a gastric bariatric operation, bands are often placed to control the restriction. Erosion into the gastric wall by these devices remains a problem. A soft resiliant prosthesis of animal origin, constituted by a network of non-absorbable collagen fibres, may be a solution to this problem. This study assessed, in a porcine model, the histological reaction of the gastric wall following apposition of a band of porcine collagen (Pelvicol, Bard).

METHODS:

15 female pigs weighing on average 21 kg underwent vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG). Stoma control was achieved with a band of porcine collagen (2 cm wide, 7 cm long and 2 mm thick). The pigs were sacrificed 1 month after VBG, and histological analysis was performed at a macroscopic and microscopic level.

RESULTS:

There was no peri-operative death, although 2 pigs died in the postoperative period (the first case developed a bowel fistula and sepsis, and the second pig died of unrelated causes). There were 2 additional morbidities (gastric fistula on the linear staple-line away from the Pelvicol band) that led to an early euthanasia of 2 pigs. Post-mortem macroscopic analyses in the remaining 11 pigs did not reveal migration of the device, and there was no tissue reaction on postoperative microscopic analyses. 10 of the pigs had lost weight at 1 month, averaging 3.42 kg.

CONCLUSION:

Porcine collagen appears to be an effective and safe alternative to the current methods of control of pouch outlet. The flexibility and homogeneity of this prosthesis may be useful to limit the risk of erosion of the gastric wall. Although these properties have been assessed in pelvic operations in humans, this work needs to be studied in a prospective long-term study in humans.

PMID:
16417756
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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