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Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2005 Dec;95(6):518-24.

Home environmental intervention in inner-city asthma: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA. pegglest@jhmi.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Airborne pollutants and indoor allergens increase asthma morbidity in inner-city children; therefore, reducing exposure, if feasible, should improve asthma morbidity.

OBJECTIVE:

To conduct a randomized controlled trial of methods to reduce environmental pollutant and allergen exposure in the homes of asthmatic children living in the inner city.

METHODS:

After the completion of questionnaires, spirometry and allergen skin tests, home inspection, and measurement of home air pollutant and allergen levels, 100 asthmatic children aged 6 to 12 years were randomized to the treatment group (home-based education, cockroach and rodent extermination, mattress and pillow encasings, and high-efficiency particulate air cleaner) or to the control group (treated at the end of the 1-year trial). Outcomes were evaluated by home evaluations at 6 and 12 months, clinic evaluation at 12 months, and multiple telephone interviews.

RESULTS:

In the treatment group, 84% received cockroach extermination and 75% used the air cleaner. Levels of particulate matter 10 microm or smaller declined by up to 39% in the treatment group but increased in the control group (P < .001). Cockroach allergen levels decreased by 51% in the treatment group. Daytime symptoms increased in the control group and decreased in the treatment group (P = .04). Other measures of morbidity, such as spirometry findings, nighttime symptoms, and emergency department use, were not significantly changed.

CONCLUSIONS:

A tailored, multifaceted environmental treatment reduced airborne particulate matter and indoor allergen levels in inner-city homes, which, in turn, had a modest effect on morbidity.

Comment in

PMID:
16400889
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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