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Proteomics. 2006 Feb;6(3):910-20.

Proteomic screening of salt-stress-induced changes in plasma membranes of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

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  • 1Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Arrhenius Laboratories for Natural Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

The plasma membrane of a cyanobacterial cell is crucial as barrier against the outer medium. It is also an energy-transducing membrane as well as essential for biogenesis of cyanobacterial photosystems and the endo-membrane system. Previously we have identified 57 different proteins in the plasma membrane of control cells from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. In the present work, proteomic screening of salt-stress proteins in the plasma membrane resulted in identification of 109 proteins corresponding to 66 different gene products. Differential and quantitative analyses of 2-DE profiles of plasma membranes isolated from both control and salt-acclimated cells revealed that twenty proteins were enhanced/induced and five reduced during salt stress. More than half of the enhanced/induced proteins were periplasmic binding proteins of ABC-transporters or hypothetical proteins. Proteins that exhibited the highest enhancement during salt stress include FutA1 (Slr1295) and Vipp1 (Sll0617), which have been suggested to be involved in protection of photosystem II under iron deficiency and in thylakoid membrane formation, respectively. Other salt-stress proteins were regulatory proteins such as PII protein, LrtA, and a protein that belongs to CheY subfamily. The physiological significance of the identified salt-stress proteins in the plasma membrane is discussed integrating our current knowledge on cyanobacterial stress physiology.

PMID:
16400685
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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