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Child Care Health Dev. 2006 Jan;32(1):73-9.

Brief intervention on maternal smoking: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

  • 1Dr Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, 06100 Altindağ, Ankara, Turkey. gonca.yilmaz@tr.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine if mothers receiving a smoking cessation intervention emphasizing health risks of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) for their children have a higher quit rate than mothers who received routine smoking cessation advice, which focused on their own health, or a control group of mothers.

SETTING:

Tertiary referral centre.

METHODS:

Randomized control trial. A total of 363 mothers were randomly assigned to a smoking cessation intervention either aimed at their children's health (n = 111) or their own health (n = 131), or to a control group receiving no smoking cessation advice (n = 121).

RESULTS:

Provision to mothers of both groups of health risks of tobacco smoke resulted in significantly higher rate of cessation of smoking and smoking location change than those of the control group, with child intervention group having significantly higher rate of cessation of smoking and smoking location change than those of the maternal intervention group (P < 0.05). Post-intervention knowledge scores differed significantly for all groups; however, child intervention group was the only significantly better group than the others (P < 0.05). According to the multivariate analysis results, intervention grouping and presence of smoking friends were independent factors determining smoking cessation (P < 0.05). Intervention grouping, post-intervention knowledge, presence of other household members who smoked and family income were independent factors determining smoking location change (P < 0.05). Family income, intervention grouping and presence of smoking friends were significant independent factors influencing post-intervention knowledge (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Discussion during short paediatric visits on effects of smoking on child's or maternal health may result in a significant smoking cessation, smoking location change rate or knowledge change. Those who cannot give up smoking usually change their location of smoking. Provision of information on effects of smoking on child's health, rather than maternal, may result in more significant changes in behaviour or knowledge. Maternal education on smoking should include information on effects of smoking on both child's and maternal health, but should be especially focused on child's health.

PMID:
16398793
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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