Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Mar;91(3):772-80. Epub 2005 Dec 29.

Clinical review: a critical evaluation of the role of soy protein and isoflavone supplementation in the control of plasma cholesterol concentrations.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutrition and Food Science, San Jose State University, One Washington Square, San Jose, California 95192-0058, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The purpose of this review was to critically evaluate current research on the effect of soy protein and isoflavone supplements on plasma lipoproteins and place the potential role of soy in the prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) into a clinical perspective.

EVIDENCE ACQUISITION:

An extensive literature search was performed using a variety of medical and scientific databases including Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Ovid, NIST, and Infotrac to identify relevant articles. Journal articles were cross-referenced for additional sources of information. Articles were evaluated based on level of experimental control as well as statistical, quantitative, and clinical analysis.

EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS:

Soy and soy isoflavones have been the object of extensive research investigating their potential hypocholesterolemic effects and possible role in the prevention of CAD. It has been suggested that soy, especially the isoflavones contained in soy, improves lipoprotein levels, thus reducing the risk for CAD. This belief, however, is not uniformly accepted. Moreover, the experimental evidence in support of this notion is not as overwhelming as generally perceived, and the current available data reveal that the discrepancies observed are primarily statistical in nature rather than reflecting actual quantitative differences in the hypocholesterolemic effects detected.

CONCLUSIONS:

A critical analysis of the investigations to date indicates the data are not quantitatively impressive and raises substantial questions about the clinical importance of the hypocholesterolemic effects observed.

PMID:
16384855
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk