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Nucleic Acids Res. 2006 Jan 1;34(Database issue):D659-63.

PRIDE: a public repository of protein and peptide identifications for the proteomics community.

Author information

  • 1EMBL Outstation, European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SD, UK. pjones@ebi.ac.uk

Abstract

PRIDE, the 'PRoteomics IDEntifications database' (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride) is a database of protein and peptide identifications that have been described in the scientific literature. These identifications will typically be from specific species, tissues and sub-cellular locations, perhaps under specific disease conditions. Any post-translational modifications that have been identified on individual peptides can be described. These identifications may be annotated with supporting mass spectra. At the time of writing, PRIDE includes the full set of identifications as submitted by individual laboratories participating in the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project and a profile of the human platelet proteome submitted by the University of Ghent in Belgium. By late 2005 PRIDE is expected to contain the identifications and spectra generated by the HUPO Brain Proteome Project. Proteomics laboratories are encouraged to submit their identifications and spectra to PRIDE to support their manuscript submissions to proteomics journals. Data can be submitted in PRIDE XML format if identifications are included or mzData format if the submitter is depositing mass spectra without identifications. PRIDE is a web application, so submission, searching and data retrieval can all be performed using an internet browser. PRIDE can be searched by experiment accession number, protein accession number, literature reference and sample parameters including species, tissue, sub-cellular location and disease state. Data can be retrieved as machine-readable PRIDE or mzData XML (the latter for mass spectra without identifications), or as human-readable HTML.

PMID:
16381953
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1347500
Free PMC Article

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