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Am J Ophthalmol. 2005 Dec;140(6):1014-1019.

Imaging polarimetry in central serous chorioretinopathy.

Author information

  • 1Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University, Kasumigaura Hospital, 3-20-1 Chuo, Ami, Inashiki, Ibaraki 300-0395, Tokyo, Japan. m-miura@tokyo-med.ac.jp

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate a noninvasive technique to detect the leakage point of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSR), using a polarimetry method.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

METHODS:

SETTING:

Institutional practice.

PATIENTS:

We examined 30 eyes of 30 patients with CSR.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Polarimetry images were recorded using the GDx-N (Laser Diagnostic Technologies). We computed four images that differed in their polarization content: a depolarized light image, an average reflectance image, a parallel polarized light image, and a birefringence image. Each polarimetry image was compared with abnormalities seen on fluorescein angiography.

RESULTS:

In all eyes, leakage area could be clearly visualized as a bright area in the depolarized light images. Michelson contrasts for the leakage areas were 0.58 +/- 0.28 in the depolarized light images, 0.17 +/- 0.11 in the average reflectance images, 0.09 +/- 0.09 in the parallel polarized light images, and 0.11 +/- 0.21 in the birefringence images from the same raw data. Michelson contrasts in depolarized light images were significantly higher than for the other three images (P < .0001, for all tests, paired t test). The fluid accumulated in the retina was well-visualized in the average and parallel polarized light images.

CONCLUSIONS:

Polarization-sensitive imaging could readily localize the leakage point and area of fluid in CSR. This may assist with the rapid, noninvasive assessment of CSR.

PMID:
16376644
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1464835
Free PMC Article
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