Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Surg. 2006 Jan;243(1):28-32.

"Anatomic" right hepatic trisectionectomy (extended right hepatectomy) with caudate lobectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

Author information

  • 1Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. nagino@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The techniques of right hepatic trisectionectomy are now standardized in patients with hepatocellular or metastatic carcinoma, but not in those with hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

METHODS:

Under preoperative diagnosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma, 8 patients underwent "anatomic" right hepatic trisectionectomy with en bloc resection of the caudate lobe and the extrahepatic bile duct, in which the bile ducts of the left lateral section were divided at the left side of the umbilical fissure following complete dissection of the umbilical plate.

RESULTS:

Liver resection was successfully performed, and all patients were discharged from the hospital in good condition, giving a mortality of 0%. All patients were histologically diagnosed as having cholangiocarcinoma. The proximal resection margins were cancer-negative in 7 patients and cancer-positive in 1 patient. Four patients with multiple lymph node metastases died of cancer recurrence within 3 years after hepatectomy. One patient died of liver failure without recurrence 42 months after hepatectomy. The remaining 3 patients without lymph node metastasis are now alive after more than 5 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Anatomic right hepatic trisectionectomy with caudate lobectomy can produce a longer proximal resection margin and can offer a better chance of long-term survival in some selected patients with advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

PMID:
16371733
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1449975
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk