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Am Heart J. 2006 Jan;151(1):69-75.

The impact of ejection fraction on outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with congestive heart failure: an analysis of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty Registry and Dynamic Registry.

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  • 1University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. eholper@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) have higher rates of adverse outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A comprehensive analysis of outcomes in patients with CHF in the current era has not been done. We studied the outcomes of patients with CHF who underwent PCI in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) and Dynamic registries.

METHODS:

We evaluated demographic and angiographic characteristics and the clinical outcomes of patients with CHF in the Dynamic Registry and the PTCA Registry, excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction. In the Dynamic Registry, patients with CHF (n = 503) were compared with patients without CHF (n = 4194), and patients with CHF with a preserved ejection fraction (EF) (n = 134) were compared with patients with CHF who have a reduced EF (n = 199). The patients with CHF in the 1997 through 2001 Dynamic Registry (n = 236) were then similarly compared with patients with CHF in the earlier PTCA Registry (n = 117).

RESULTS:

In the Dynamic Registry, compared with patients without CHF, patients with CHF had a higher-risk clinical and angiographic profile, and a higher mortality rate both inhospital (2.6% vs 0.4%, P < or = .001) and at 1 year (13.1% vs 3.0%, P < .001). Patients with reduced EF had higher inhospital mortality rates and a trend toward higher mortality at 1 year. The patients with CHF in the Dynamic Registry compared with those in the PTCA Registry had a higher risk profile yet had significantly higher procedural success rates and improved clinical outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although CHF remains a strong predictor of adverse outcomes after PCI, significant improvement seen in the past decade is likely related to improved procedural techniques and improved medical therapy.

PMID:
16368294
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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