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J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Jan;59(1):82-9. Epub 2005 Oct 13.

The diagnosis of a smoking-related disease is a prominent trigger for smoking cessation in a retrospective cohort study.

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  • 1German Center for Research on Ageing, Bergheimer Str. 20, D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated the impact of demographic factors, smoking patterns, and the occurrence of smoking-related diseases on smoking cessation, with a particular emphasis on the temporal relationship between diagnosis of smoking-related diseases and cessation.

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING:

A cohort was assembled of participants of a general health screening examination aged 50-74 years. Lifetime smoking habits and medical history were obtained by a self-administered questionnaire. In a retrospective cohort study approach, predictors of cessation among ever-smokers (n = 4,575) were identified using the extended proportional hazards model.

RESULTS:

Male gender, late onset of smoking, and higher educational level were predictive of cessation. However, the by far strongest predictors of cessation were diagnoses of smoking-related diseases: relative cessation rates in the year of disease occurrence were 11.2 for myocardial infarction (95% confidence interval CI = 8.9-14.0), 7.2 for stroke (95% CI = 5.1-11.6), 2.5 for diabetes mellitus (95% CI = 1.6-4.0) and 4.8 for cancer (95% CI = 3.1-7.4) relative to years before diagnosis of the respective diseases.

CONCLUSION:

Our results underline the key role of perceived detrimental effects of smoking for cessation. When smokers personally experience the health consequences of smoking, many permanently quit.

PMID:
16360565
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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