Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Med Res. 2005 Dec 7;10(12):503-8.

Effect of first line therapy including efavirenz and two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV-infected children.

Author information

  • 1Children's Hospital, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany. m.funk@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In an intent-to-treat study, reduction of viral load, increase in CD4 cell count, clinical benefit and adverse reactions were examined in HIV-infected children receiving first line therapy including efavirenz.

METHODS:

The data of 10 perinatally infected children (median age: 5.8 years) were evaluated during a treatment period of 24 months. Viral load and CD4 cell count were measured every 4 - 8 weeks. Pharmacokinetic evaluations of efavirenz were performed in all patients at study onset. Adverse reactions were reported after obtaining interval history and examination.

RESULTS:

At base line, median CD4 cell count was 378 cells/microl (21%) and median viral load was 350,000 copies/ml (5.5 log10 copies/ml). After 24 months of treatment, the median viral load reduction was > 3.5 log10 copies/ ml and HIV-1 RNA < 50 copies/ml was found in 8/10 children (80%). Median CD4 cell count increased to 721 cells/microl (24%) after 3 months and was maintained at a level of >1000 cells/microl (> 25%) after 24 months of treatment. Regarding efavirenz levels, C min. values ranged from 845 to 3550 ng/ml (median: 1845 ng/ml) and C max. values from 2380 to 24 200 ng/ ml (median: 3670 ng/ml). The most common adverse effect was a mild skin rash (4/10 children). CNS symptoms were recorded in one patient and no hyperlipidaemia was seen.

CONCLUSION:

First line therapy with efavirenz and two NRTIs was well tolerated by HIV-1 infected children and the reduction of viral load seems to be similar to single protease inhibitor-containing regimens.

PMID:
16356864
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk