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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 May;60(5):567-72.

Oligofructose promotes satiety in healthy human: a pilot study.

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  • 1Unit of Pharmacokinetics, Metabolism, Nutrition and Toxicology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universit√© catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The administration of a fermentable dietary fibre (oligofructose) in rats increases satietogenic gut peptides and lowered spontaneous energy intake. The aim of the study was to assess the relevance of those effects of oligofructose on satiety and energy intake in humans.

DESIGN:

Single-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled design, pilot study.

SUBJECTS:

Volunteers included five men and five women aged 21-39 years, BMI ranging from 18.5 to 27.4 kg/m(2), were randomly assigned as described below.

INTERVENTIONS:

Subjects were included in two 2-week experimental phases during which they received either fibre (oligofructose (OFS)) or placebo (dextrine maltose (DM)); a 2-week washout period was included between crossover phases. In total, 8 g OFS or 8 g DM were ingested twice daily (16 g/day in total). Energy intake, hunger, satiety, fullness and prospective food consumption were assessed with analogue scales at the end of each experimental phase.

RESULTS:

During breakfast, OFS significantly increases the satiety (P=0.04) without any difference on other sensations as compared to DM treatment periods. After lunch, no significant differences are observed between treatment period. At dinner, OFS significantly increases satiety (P=0.04), reduces hunger (P=0.04) and prospective food consumption (P=0.05). The energy intake at breakfast and lunch are significantly lower (P=0.01, 0.03, respectively) after OFS treatment than after DM treatment. Total energy intake per day is 5% lower during OFS than in DM period.

CONCLUSION:

Oligofructose treatment increases satiety following breakfast and dinner, reduces hunger and prospective food consumption following dinner. This pilot study presents a rationale to propose oligofructose supplements in the management of food intake in overweight and obese patients.

PMID:
16340949
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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