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J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2005 Nov;30(6):416-22.

Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the anterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex and thalamus in schizophrenia associated with idiopathic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome).

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Shimane University School of Medicine, Izumo, Japan. rei@med.shimane-u.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether patients with schizophrenia associated with idiopathic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome [GS]) have specific changes in brain metabolism.

METHODS:

We applied proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) to the anterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex and thalamus of patients with schizophrenia and GS (n = 15) or without GS (n = 15), all diagnosed with schizophrenia according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV), and healthy subjects (n = 20).

RESULTS:

In the anterior cingulate gyrus, patients with schizophrenia and GS showed significant decreases in N-acetyl aspartate/creatine-phosphocreatinine (NAA/Cr), choline/creatine-phosphocreatinine (Cho/Cr) and myoinositol/creatine-phosphocreatinine (ml/Cr) ratios compared with healthy subjects and compared with patients with schizophrenia without GS. Patients with schizophrenia without GS also showed significant decreases in NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and ml/Cr compared with healthy subjects. In the insular cortex, patients with schizophrenia and GS showed significant decreases in NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and ml/Cr compared with healthy subjects and compared with patients with schizophrenia without GS. Patients with schizophrenia without GS also showed significant decreases in NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and ml/Cr compared with healthy subjects. In the thalamus, patients with schizophrenia and GS showed significant decreases in NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and ml/Cr compared with healthy subjects, whereas patients with schizophrenia without GS only showed a significant decrease in ml/Cr compared with healthy subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that brain metabolism is more severely compromised in the subtype of schizophrenia with GS.

PMID:
16327875
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1277024
Free PMC Article

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