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J Immunol Methods. 2006 Jan 20;308(1-2):138-55. Epub 2005 Nov 21.

Phenotype and function of myeloid dendritic cells derived from African green monkey blood monocytes.

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  • 1Unité de Régulation des Infections Rétrovirales, Institut Pasteur, 25, rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France.

Abstract

Myeloid dendritic cells probably play an important role in the immune response against HIV and SIV, and in the enhancement of CD4+ T cell infection. Here, we have investigated phenotypic and functional features of myeloid monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) from African green monkeys (AGMs). AGMs are natural hosts of SIV and exhibit no signs of abnormal T cell activation despite high SIV plasma viremia. We identified mAbs that cross-react specifically with homologous molecules expressed on AGM DC. We adapted a protocol to derive AGM MDDC by culture in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. The differentiated cells possessed a typical dendritic morphology and the majority were CD11c+ DC-SIGN+. AGM MDDC displayed a high expression of typical maturation markers, such as CD83, CD86 and DC-LAMP, and moderate immunostimulatory capacity, suggesting that the cells were in a semi-mature state. Stimulation resulted in further maturation, as shown by up-regulation of CD80 and decrease of endocytosis ability. However, neither increase of HLA-DR or CD40 expression nor enhanced immunostimulatory capacity was observed. The latter was associated with a low pro-inflammatory cytokine production during mixed lymphocyte reactions and a cytokine balance in favour of IL-10 in contrast to human MDDC. This is the first characterization of AGM MDDC. The tools described here are a crucial step for future studies in vivo or in vitro on the function of myeloid DC using the AGM animal model.

PMID:
16325847
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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