Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Genetics. 2006 Feb;172(2):863-72. Epub 2005 Dec 1.

After the duplication: gene loss and adaptation in Saccharomyces genomes.

Author information

  • 1Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.

Abstract

The ancient duplication of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome and subsequent massive loss of duplicated genes is apparent when it is compared to the genomes of related species that diverged before the duplication event. To learn more about the evolutionary effects of the duplication event, we compared the S. cerevisiae genome to other Saccharomyces genomes. We demonstrate that the whole genome duplication occurred before S. castellii diverged from S. cerevisiae. In addition to more accurately dating the duplication event, this finding allowed us to study the effects of the duplication on two separate lineages. Analyses of the duplication regions of the genomes indicate that most of the duplicated genes (approximately 85%) were lost before the speciation. Only a small amount of paralogous gene loss (4-6%) occurred after speciation. On the other hand, S. castellii appears to have lost several hundred genes that were not retained as duplicated paralogs. These losses could be related to genomic rearrangements that reduced the number of chromosomes from 16 to 9. In addition to S. castellii, other Saccharomyces sensu lato species likely diverged from S. cerevisiae after the duplication. A thorough analysis of these species will likely reveal other important outcomes of the whole genome duplication.

PMID:
16322519
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1456250
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (3)Free text

Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk