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BMJ. 2005 Dec 10;331(7529):1371. Epub 2005 Dec 1.

Cannabis intoxication and fatal road crashes in France: population based case-control study.

Author information

  • 1French National Institute for Transport and Safety Research (INRETS), Epidemiological Research and Surveillance Unit in Transport, Occupation and Environment (UMRESTTE), 25 avenue Fran├žois Mitterrand, F-69675 Bron Cedex. bernard.laumon@inrets.fr

Erratum in

  • BMJ. 2006 Jun 3;332(7553):1298.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the relative risk of being responsible for a fatal crash while driving under the influence of cannabis, the prevalence of such drivers within the driving population, and the corresponding share of fatal crashes.

DESIGN:

Population based case-control study.

PARTICIPANTS:

10 748 drivers, with known drug and alcohol concentrations, who were involved in fatal crashes in France from October 2001 to September 2003.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The cases were the 6766 drivers considered at fault in their crash; the controls were 3006 drivers selected from the 3982 other drivers. Positive detection of cannabis was defined as a blood concentration of Delta9tetrahydrocannabinol of over 1 ng/ml. The prevalence of positive drivers in the driving population was estimated by standardising controls on drivers not at fault who were involved in crashes resulting in slight injuries.

RESULTS:

681 drivers were positive for cannabis (cases 8.8%, controls 2.8%), including 285 with an illegal blood alcohol concentration (> or = 0.5 g/l). Positive cannabis detection was associated with increased risk of responsibility (odds ratio 3.32, 95% confidence interval 2.63 to 4.18). A significant dose effect was identified; the odds ratio increased from 2.18 (1.22 to 3.89) if 0 < Delta9tetrahydrocannabinol < 1 ng/ml to 4.72 (3.04 to 7.33) if Delta9tetrahydrocannabinol > or = 5 ng/ml. The effect of cannabis remains significant after adjustment for different cofactors, including alcohol, with which no statistical interaction was observed. The prevalence of cannabis (2.9%) estimated for the driving population is similar to that for alcohol (2.7%). At least 2.5% (1.5% to 3.5%) of fatal crashes were estimated as being attributable to cannabis, compared with 28.6% for alcohol (26.8% to 30.5%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Driving under the influence of cannabis increases the risk of involvement in a crash. However, in France its share in fatal crashes is significantly lower than that associated with positive blood alcohol concentration.

PMID:
16321993
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1309644
Free PMC Article

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