Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Apr;60(4):494-501.

Snacks as an element of energy intake and food consumption.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Nutrition Unit, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. marja-leena.ovaskainen@ktl.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An increasing frequency of snacks has been observed in meal pattern studies. Snacks can alter the diet because of their high-energy density and low-nutrient content or on the contrary.

OBJECTIVE:

The prominence of snacks in energy intake and food consumption was assessed.

DESIGN:

Dietary data were collected for 2007 adults by using a computer-assisted 48-h dietary recall in the national FINDIET 2002 survey. Energy intakes and food consumption were aggregated for snacks and for main meals.

RESULTS:

Daily energy was mostly derived from main meals comprising traditional mixed dishes, milk and bread. However, a snack-dominating meal pattern was observed in 19% of men and 24% of women. This meal pattern was associated with urbanization in both genders and with physical work in men. Higher sucrose intake and lower intake of micronutrients were typical of the snack-dominating meal pattern compared to the others.

CONCLUSIONS:

As snacks appear to have a higher energy density and a lower content of micronutrients than main meals, a snack-dominating meal pattern is inadvisable. However, further studies are needed to examine the association between meal pattern and health status.

PMID:
16319836
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk