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Carcinogenesis. 2006 May;27(5):1030-7. Epub 2005 Nov 25.

Concordance of multiple analytical approaches demonstrates a complex relationship between DNA repair gene SNPs, smoking and bladder cancer susceptibility.

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  • 1Department of Community and Family Medicine, Section of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA. Angeline.Andrew@dartmouth.edu

Abstract

Study results of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cancer susceptibility are often conflicting, possibly because of the analytic challenges of testing for multiple genetic and environmental risk factors using traditional analytic tools. We investigated the relationship between DNA repair gene SNPs, smoking, and bladder cancer susceptibility in 355 cases and 559 controls enrolled in a population-based study of bladder cancer in the US. Our multifaceted analytical approach included logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction, and hierarchical interaction graphs for the analysis of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions followed by linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis. Overall, we did not find an association between any single DNA repair gene SNP and bladder cancer risk. We did find a marginally significant elevated risk of the XPD codon 751 homozygote variant among never smokers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-6.2]. In addition, the XRCC1 194 variant allele was associated with a reduced bladder cancer risk among heavy smokers [adjusted OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9)]. The best predictors of bladder cancer included the XPD codon 751 and 312 SNPs along with smoking. Interpretation of this multifactor model revealed that the relationship between the XPD SNPs and bladder cancer is mostly non-additive while the effect of smoking is mostly additive. Since the two XPD SNPs are in significant linkage disequilibrium (D' = 0.52, P = 0.0001), we estimated XPD haplotypes. Individuals with variant XPD haplotypes were more susceptible to bladder cancer [e.g. adjusted OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.6] and the effect was magnified when smoking was considered. These results support the hypothesis that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes modify bladder cancer risk and emphasize the need for a multifaceted statistical approach to identify gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

PMID:
16311243
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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