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Schizophr Res. 2006 Jan 31;81(2-3):145-50. Epub 2005 Nov 17.

Course of substance misuse and daily tobacco use in first-episode psychosis.

Author information

  • 1ORYGEN Youth Health, Locked Bag 10, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia. dwade@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Study of the course of substance misuse and daily tobacco use in first-episode psychosis may enhance detection and treatment of these substance-related problems.

METHODS:

This 15-month follow-up study examined the course of substance misuse and daily tobacco use in 103 individuals treated for first-episode psychosis.

RESULTS:

Three-quarters (72.6%) of patients with lifetime substance misuse, or half (51.5%) of all patients, continued substance misuse (primarily cannabis) during the 15-month follow-up period. There was a significant reduction in the rate of any substance misuse (70.9% versus 53.4%) but not daily tobacco use (76.7% versus 75.7%) between baseline and 15-month follow-up. Patients who continued substance misuse showed a significant reduction in the severity and frequency of substance use between baseline and follow-up. Patients who continued substance misuse were more likely to be younger, male and single, less likely to have completed secondary school, and more likely to have had more severe cannabis use prior to entry to treatment compared to patients who ceased substance misuse.

DISCUSSION:

A significant proportion of young patients treated for first-episode psychosis are at risk of mental and physical health problems associated with substance misuse and/or regular tobacco use.

PMID:
16298107
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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