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Am Heart J. 2005 Nov;150(5):1017-25.

Sex differences in depression after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. rachel.mitchell@uhn.on.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous research suggests that after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, women fare worse than men. This study investigates sex differences in depression during recovery from CABG surgery.

METHODS:

We followed 137 patients (72 men, 65 women) undergoing elective isolated first CABG surgery between July 2003 and April 2004. Patients were interviewed < or = 28 days before surgery and between 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Patients completed a structured diagnostic interview for major depressive disorder (MDD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Clinical data were retrieved from patient charts.

RESULTS:

Prevalence of MDD before surgery was 28.2%, but decreased to 16.4% after surgery (P = .038). Women had significantly more depressive symptoms than men pre-CABG, with a mean BDI of 12.5 (95% CI 10.6-14.4) for women versus 8.0 (95% CI 6.3-9.8) for men (P = .0001), but not post-CABG. There was a significant sex-by-time interaction with depressive symptoms in women improving almost 6-fold more than in men, with BDI change scores of 4.1 (95% CI 2.0-6.1) for women versus 0.7 (95% CI-1.0-2.5) for men (P = .008). The interaction remained significant after adjusting the model for the predetermined baseline characteristics education, social support, and operative risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

Women had more depressive symptoms than men pre-CABG, but improved to a level comparable to men post-CABG. Women benefited from CABG as much or more than men in terms of their mental health. Preoperative depressive symptoms should not preclude women from CABG surgery.

PMID:
16290990
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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