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Am Heart J. 2005 Nov;150(5):961-7.

Depression predicts mortality and hospitalization in patients with myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure.

Author information

  • 1Section of Cardiology, Denver VA Medical Center, Denver, Colorado 80220, USA. john.rumsfeld@med.va.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To evaluate whether depressive symptoms are independently predictive of mortality and hospitalization among patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicated by heart failure.

METHODS:

The EPHESUS trial enrolled patients with AMI complicated by heart failure. Patients from Canada, the UK, and the United States completed a Medical Outcomes Study-Depression questionnaire at baseline in addition to a comprehensive clinical examination. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to determine the relationship between depressive symptoms and outcomes, including 2-year all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death or hospitalization, adjusting for baseline clinical variables.

RESULTS:

Overall, 143 of 634 patients (22.6%) had significant depressive symptoms at baseline (Medical Outcomes Study-Depression score > or = 0.06). Depressed patients had higher 2-year mortality (29% vs 18%; P = .004) and cardiovascular death or hospitalization (42% vs 33%; P = .016). After risk adjustment, depressive symptoms remained significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% CI 1.15-2.68, P = .01) and cardiovascular death or hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.41, 95% CI 1.03-1.93, P = .03). Results were consistent across demographic and clinical subgroups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Depression is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death or hospitalization after AMI complicated by heart failure. Although many factors may mediate outcomes in patients with AMI, studies are warranted to evaluate whether a depression intervention can improve survival and/or reduce hospitalizations.

PMID:
16290972
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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