Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neuropharmacology. 2006 Mar;50(3):297-308. Epub 2005 Nov 9.

The neurotoxin 2'-NH2-MPTP degenerates serotonin axons and evokes increases in hippocampal BDNF.

Author information

  • 1Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

Abstract

1-Methyl-4-(2'-aminophenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (2'-NH2-MPTP) causes long-term depletions in cortical and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) that are accompanied by acute elevations in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and argyrophilia. To further investigate the hypothesis that these changes are reflective of serotonergic and noradrenergic axonal degeneration, 2'-NH2-MPTP was administered to mice and innervation densities were determined immunocytochemically. Regional responses of the neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), to putative damage were also assessed. Three days after 2'-NH2-MPTP, 5-HT axons exhibited a beaded, tortuous appearance indicative of ongoing degeneration. At 21 days, numbers of serotonin axons were significantly decreased, with the greatest axonal losses occurring in cortex and hippocampus. Serotonin axons in the amygdala were contrastingly spared long-term damage, as were 5-HT and NE cell bodies in the brain stem. BDNF protein levels were selectively increased in the hippocampus 3 days post-dose and returned to normal 21 days later. These results, in conjunction with previous findings, demonstrate that 2'-NH2-MPTP causes degeneration of serotonergic axons innervating the cortex and hippocampus on par with depletions in neurotransmitter levels. Moreover, damage to the hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory, and the modulation of anxiety and stress responsiveness, results in a transitory increase in BDNF.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk