Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Circulation. 2005 Nov 15;112(20):3073-9.

Ambient air pollution is associated with increased risk of hospital cardiac readmissions of myocardial infarction survivors in five European cities.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Epidemiology, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Germany. klot@gsf.de

Erratum in

  • Circulation. 2006 Feb 7;113(5):e71.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ambient air pollution has been associated with increases in acute morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of urban air pollution on cardiac hospital readmissions in survivors of myocardial infarction, a potentially susceptible subpopulation.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

In this European multicenter cohort study, 22,006 survivors of a first myocardial infarction were recruited in Augsburg, Germany; Barcelona, Spain; Helsinki, Finland; Rome, Italy; and Stockholm, Sweden, from 1992 to 2000. Hospital readmissions were recorded in 1992 to 2001. Ambient nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, and mass of particles <10 microm (PM10) were measured. Particle number concentrations were estimated as a proxy for ultrafine particles. Short-term effects of air pollution on hospital readmissions for myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, and cardiac causes (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, dysrhythmia, or heart failure) were studied in city-specific Poisson regression analyses with subsequent pooling. During follow-up, 6655 cardiac readmissions were observed. Cardiac readmissions increased in association with same-day concentrations of PM10 (rate ratio [RR] 1.021, 95% CI 1.004 to 1.039) per 10 microg/m3) and estimated particle number concentrations (RR 1.026 [95% CI 1.005 to 1.048] per 10,000 particles/cm3). Effects of similar strength were observed for carbon monoxide (RR 1.014 [95% CI 1.001 to 1.026] per 200 microg/m3 [0.172 ppm]), nitrogen dioxide (RR 1.032 [95% CI 1.013 to 1.051] per 8 microg/m3 [4.16 ppb]), and ozone (RR 1.026 [95% CI 1.001 to 1.051] per 15 microg/m3 [7.5 ppb]). Pooled effect estimates for angina pectoris and myocardial infarction readmissions were comparable.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggest that ambient air pollution is associated with increased risk of hospital cardiac readmissions of myocardial infarction survivors in 5 European cities.

Comment in

PMID:
16286602
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk