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Oncol Nurs Forum. 2005 Nov 3;32(6):1207-16.

Collaborative breast health intervention for African American women of lower socioeconomic status.

Author information

  • 1College of Nursing and Health, Wright State University, Dayton, OH, USA. barbara.fowler@wright.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:

To describe all phases of a collaborative breast health intervention delivered by paraprofessionals or specially trained community health advisors (CHAs) for African American women designed to increase mammography screening.

DESIGN:

Collaborative pretest, post-test breast health intervention.

SETTING:

Large city in Ohio.

SAMPLE:

68 African American women with a median age of 57.8 (SD = 5.28) obtained mammography screening and participated in the breast health intervention.

METHODS:

Specially trained CHAs used aggressive recruitment strategies to increase mammography screening and knowledge of breast health and mammography screening in African American women aged 50 and older.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:

Knowledge scores of breast health and mammography screening.

FINDINGS:

Ninety women (81%) met the inclusion criteria and were recruited into the intervention, but only 68 (76%) obtained mammography screening. The women demonstrated increased knowledge by change in pre- to post-test scores. Several questions were statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Collaborative breast health interventions delivered by trained CHAs are effective in increasing screenings as well as knowledge of breast health and mammography screening in African American women. The unique role of the CHA is especially important in recruitment of hard-to-reach women and was vital to the success of the educational intervention. Most importantly, the women valued the individualized attention to their breast health and agreed to share the information with significant others. Further collaborative interventions designed to increase screenings and increase knowledge of breast health and mammography screening are needed to reduce the health disparities of later-stage detection and poorer survival of breast cancer in African American women.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING:

Oncology nurses should build on the findings and deliver further outreach programs to increase mammography screening and knowledge of breast health in a larger number of women of lower socioeconomic status. Future research is needed to determine the influence of reminder phone calls for mammography screening. Oncology nurses should incorporate evaluation strategies at baseline and periodically throughout an intervention to provide more comprehensive data and enhance the credibility of findings. To maximize success, oncology nurses should work collaboratively with other healthcare professionals such as certified x-ray technicians and influential people in the community to increase knowledge of breast health and mammography screening.

PMID:
16270116
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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