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Mol Cell Proteomics. 2006 Feb;5(2):226-33. Epub 2005 Oct 31.

Elucidation of N-glycosylation sites on human platelet proteins: a glycoproteomic approach.

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  • 1Protein Mass Spectrometry and Functional Proteomics Group, Rudolf Virchow Center for Experimental Biomedicine, Versbacher Strasse 9, 97078 Wuerzburg, Germany.

Abstract

Among known platelet proteins, a prominent and functionally important group is represented by glycoprotein isoforms. They account e.g. for secretory proteins and plasma membrane receptors including integrins and glycoprotein VI as well as intracellular components of cytosol and organelles including storage proteins (multimerin 1 etc.). Although many of those proteins have been studied for some time with regard to their function, little attention has been paid with respect to their glycosylation sites. Here we report the analysis of N-glycosylation sites of human platelet proteins. For the enrichment of glycopeptides, lectin affinity chromatography as well as chemical trapping of protein bound oligosaccharides was used. Therefore, concanavalin A was used for specific interaction with carbohydrate species along with periodic acid oxidation and hydrazide bead trapping of glycosylated proteins. Derivatization by peptide:N-glycosidase F yielded deglycosylated peptides, which provided the basis for the elucidation of proteins and their sites of modification. Using both methods in combination with nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis 70 different glycosylation sites within 41 different proteins were identified. Comparison with the Swiss-Prot database established that the majority of these 70 sites have not been specifically determined by previous research projects. With this approach including hydrazide bead affinity trapping, the immunoglobulin receptor G6f, which is known to couple to the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in the immune system, was shown here for the first time to be present in human platelets.

PMID:
16263699
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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