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J Biosci Bioeng. 2004;97(1):65-70.

Effect of ammonium addition on methanogenic community in a fluidized bed anaerobic digestion.

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  • 1Institute for Energy Utilization, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569, Japan. s.sawayama@aist.go.jp

Abstract

After immobilization of anaerobes on carbon felt in a fluidized-bed anaerobic digester at an ammonium concentration of 500 mg N/l, the results of real-time PCR analysis indicated that the cell densities of the immobilized methanogens and bacteria increased compared with those of the free-living methanogens and bacteria in the original anaerobically digested sewage sludge, respectively. The results of the clone analysis of the original sludge suggested that the major methanogens were Methanosaeta sp. and the members of the order Methanomicrobiales, and that after immobilization, these were changed to Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina sp. The results of real-time PCR analysis also showed that the ratio of the Methanosaeta sp. in the methanogenic archaea decreased from 58.2% to 0.3% after the immobilization. Methane production decreased at ammonium concentrations of greater than 6000 mg N/l. The results of real-time PCR analysis indicated that the cell density of the immobilized archaea decreased at ammonium concentrations of greater than 3000 mg N/l. On the other hand, the cell density of the immobilized bacteria did not decrease at an ammonium concentration of 6000 mg N/l, but decreased at that of 9000 mg N/l. The major methanogenic clones immobilized on the carbon felt at an ammonium concentration of 3000 or 6000 mg N/l were Methanobacterium sp. The present results indicated that methanogens were relatively more sensitive to ammonium than bacteria.

PMID:
16233591
[PubMed]
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