Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
BJU Int. 2005 Nov;96(7):999-1004.

Clinical staging of prostate cancer: a computer-simulated study of transperineal prostate biopsy.

Author information

  • 1Radiation Oncology, Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center at Fitzsimons, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify the precise location of prostate cancer within the gland and thus possibly permit more aggressive therapy of the lesion, while potentially sparing the noncancerous gland from ablative therapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Three-dimensional "solid" computer models were reconstructed for 86 autopsy specimens and 20 stage T1c radical prostatectomy specimens. Transperineal biopsies were simulated for grid sizes of 5-mm (method A) and 10-mm (method B) with an 18 G, 23-mm long biopsy needle. One or two biopsies per grid point were obtained for a total of 12-108 biopsies, depending on the size of the prostate. Clinically threatening cancers were defined as having volumes of > or = 0.5 mL or Gleason sum > or = 7.

RESULTS:

Method A detected significantly more carcinomas than method B in both the autopsy and prostatectomy specimens (autopsy, 72 vs 51; prostatectomy, 50 vs 32, both P < 0.001). Method A also detected more clinically threatening cancers found at autopsy (38/40 vs 31/40, P = 0.008). Among autopsy patients with negative sextant biopsies whose disease was localized to one side, method A detected 72% and method B detected 29-43% (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this computer simulation show that 5- and 10-mm grid biopsies detect three-quarters and a third, respectively, at autopsy, of patients with the disease localized to one side of the prostate, which may be useful when planning highly selective ablative treatments in the future.

PMID:
16225516
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk