Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 1;192(9):1577-87. Epub 2005 Sep 29.

Distinct mechanisms of T cell reconstitution can be identified by estimating thymic volume in adult HIV-1 disease.

Author information

  • 1Division of Infectious Diseases, MetroHealth Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44109-1998, USA. rkalayjian@metrohealth.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We have attempted to identify factors associated with T cell reconstitution in response to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

METHODS:

In a prospective, multicenter cohort study, we compared clinical, immune, and viral responses to an initial antiretroviral regimen in older (>or=45 years old) versus younger (18-30 years old) human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected subjects. Multivariable linear-regression models identified independent factors associated with changes in T cell counts.

RESULTS:

Older subjects had smaller increases in naive T cells but greater T cell receptor-excision circle DNA content after 48 weeks, despite similar virologic responses and comparable reductions in immune activation. Changes in T cell counts were associated with plasma interleukin (IL)-7 levels in subjects with low thymic scores, whereas first-phase T cell increases (perhaps mediated by redistribution to the circulation of tissue-associated lymphocytes) were associated with reductions in immune activation in subjects with high thymic scores. Reductions in immune activation were associated with reductions in spontaneous lymphocyte apoptosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Distinct processes may underlie T cell restoration, according to estimated thymic volumes. IL-7-mediated peripheral expansion may drive T cell restoration in persons with low thymic volume, whereas therapy-associated reversal of immune reactivation may drive T cell losses and their restoration in persons with larger thymic volume.

PMID:
16206072
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk