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Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2005 Dec;125(10):696-700. Epub 2005 Sep 28.

Fractures of the scapula surgical neck: outcome after conservative treatment in 13 cases.

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  • 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Spaarne Hospital Hoofddorp, P.O. Box 770, 2130, AT, Hoofddorp, The Netherlands. a.van.noort01@freeler.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Conservative treatment of fractures of the scapular neck does not uniformly lead to a success. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the occurrence of glenoid displacement in conservatively treated patients with a scapular neck fracture without concomitant shoulder girdle injury in relation with the clinical outcome.

METHODS:

Between 1991 and 2001, 177 patients with a fracture of the scapula were treated in two Dutch clinics. Twenty-four patients sustained a scapular neck fracture, who all, with the exception of one, were treated non-operatively. At follow-up, 13 patients had a functional evaluation and were assessed clinically at an average of 5.5 years after the injury.

RESULTS:

All fractures healed uneventfully. At final radiographic evaluation, four patients were found with significant translational displacement of fracture fragments (>1 cm); however, no angular displacement of the glenoid was found (no GPA < 20 degrees ). The functional outcome of the 13 patients was excellent (Constant score: 90). No correlation was found between functional outcome and malunion. There was no significant difference between the SF-36 scores in the follow-up group and the scores for age-matched controls in the general population.

CONCLUSIONS:

Non-operative treatment of a surgical neck fracture of the scapula in absence of an ipsilateral shoulder injury and associated permanent neurological impairment leads to a good to excellent functional outcome, with or without significant translational displacement.

PMID:
16189689
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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