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Clin Nurse Spec. 2005 Sep-Oct;19(5):241-51; quiz 252-4.

Hospital nurse staffing and patient mortality, emotional exhaustion, and job dissatisfaction.

Author information

  • 1United Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota 55102, USA. Margo.A.Halm@allina.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To conduct an investigation similar to a landmark study that investigated the association between nurse-to-patient ratio and patient mortality, failure-to-rescue, emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction of nurses.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis of 2709 general, orthopedic, and vascular surgery patients, and 140 staff nurses (42% response rate) caring for these patients in a large Midwestern institution. The main outcome measures were mortality, failure-to-rescue, emotional exhaustion, and job dissatisfaction.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Staffing was not a significant predictor of mortality or failure-to-rescue, nor did clinical specialty predict emotional exhaustion or job dissatisfaction. Although these findings reinforce adequate staffing ratios at this institution, programs that support nurses in their daily practice and positively impact job satisfaction need to be explored. The Nursing Research Council not only has heightened awareness of how staffing ratios affect patient and nurse outcomes, but also a broader understanding of how the research process can be used to effectively shape nurse's practice and work environments.

PMID:
16179855
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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