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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Dec 15;172(12):1569-74. Epub 2005 Sep 22.

Effect of ductus ligation on cardiopulmonary function in premature baboons.

Author information

  • 1Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX, USA. mccurnin@uthscsa.edu

Abstract

RATIONALE:

The role of the patent ductus arteriosus in the development of chronic lung disease in surfactant-treated premature newborns remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effects of ductus ligation on cardiopulmonary function and lung histopathology in premature primates.

METHODS:

Baboons were delivered at 125 d, (term = 185 d) treated with surfactant, and ventilated for 14 d. Serial echocardiograms and pulmonary function tests were performed. Animals were randomized to ligation (n = 12) or no ligation (controls, n = 13) on Day 6 of life. Necropsy was performed on Day 14.

RESULTS:

Compared with nonligated control animals, ligated animals had lower pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratios, higher systemic blood pressures, and improved indices of right and left ventricular performance. The ligated animals tended to have better compliance and ventilation indices for the last 3 d of the study. There were no differences between the groups in proinflammatory tracheal cytokines (interleukin [IL] 6 and IL-8), static lung compliance, or lung histology.

CONCLUSION:

Although a persistent patent ductus arteriosus results in diminished cardiac function and increased ventilatory requirements at the end of the second week of life, ligation on Day 6 had no measurable effect on the histologic evolution of chronic lung injury in this 14-d baboon model.

PMID:
16179644
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2718457
Free PMC Article

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