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BMJ. 2005 Oct 15;331(7521):877. Epub 2005 Sep 16.

Recurrence of pre-eclampsia across generations: exploring fetal and maternal genetic components in a population based cohort.

Author information

  • 1Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. Rolv.Skjaerven@smis.uib.no

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the impact on risk of pre-eclampsia of genes that work through the mother, and genes of paternal origin that work through the fetus.

DESIGN:

Population based cohort study.

SETTING:

Registry data from Norway.

PARTICIPANTS:

Linked generational data from the medical birth registry of Norway (1967-2003): 438,597 mother-offspring units and 286,945 father-offspring units.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pre-eclampsia in the second generation.

RESULTS:

The daughters of women who had pre-eclampsia during pregnancy had more than twice the risk of pre-eclampsia themselves (odds ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 2.4) compared with other women. Men born after a pregnancy complicated by pre-eclampsia had a moderately increased risk of fathering a pre-eclamptic pregnancy (1.5, 1.3 to 1.7). Sisters of affected men or women, who were themselves born after pregnancies not complicated by pre-eclampsia, also had an increased risk (2.0, 1.7 to 2.3). Women and men born after pre-eclamptic pregnancies were more likely to trigger severe pre-eclampsia in their own (or their partner's) pregnancy (3.0, 2.4 to 3.7, for mothers and 1.9, 1.4 to 2.5, for fathers).

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal genes and fetal genes from either the mother or father may trigger pre-eclampsia. The maternal association is stronger than the fetal association. The familial association predicts more severe pre-eclampsia.

PMID:
16169871
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1255793
Free PMC Article
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