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Mech Dev. 2005 Nov;122(11):1206-17. Epub 2005 Aug 16.

In Drosophila melanogaster, the rolling pebbles isoform 6 (Rols6) is essential for proper Malpighian tubule morphology.

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  • 1Philipps-Universität Marburg, Fachbereich Biologie, Entwicklungsbiologie, Karl-von-Frisch-Str. 8, 35043 Marburg, Germany.

Abstract

During myoblast fusion, cell-cell recognition along with cell migration and adhesion are essential biological processes. The factors involved in these processes include members of the immunoglobulin superfamily like Sticks and stones (Sns), Dumbfounded (Duf) and Hibris (Hbs), SH3 domain-containing adaptor molecules like Myoblast city (Mbc) and multidomain proteins like Rolling pebbles (Rols). For rolling pebbles, two differentially expressed transcripts have been defined (rols7 and rols6). However, to date, only a muscle fusion phenotype has been described and assigned to the lack of the mesoderm-specific expressed rols7 transcript. Here, we show that a loss of the second rolling pebbles transcript, rols6, which is expressed from the early bud to later embryonic stages during Malpighian tubule (MpT) development, leads to an abnormal MpT morphology that is not due to defects in cell determination or proliferation but to aberrant morphogenesis. In addition, when Myoblast city or Rac are knocked out, a similar phenotype is observed. Myoblast city and Rac are essentially involved in the development of the somatic muscles and were proposed to be interaction partners of Rols7. Because of the predicted structural similarities of the Rols7 and Rols6 proteins, we argue that genetic interaction of rols6, mbc and rac might lead to proper MpT morphology. We also propose that these interactions result in stable cell connections due to rearrangement of the cytoskeleton.

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