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Clin Ther. 2005 Jul;27(7):1104-11.

Comprehensive medication therapy management: identifying and resolving drug-related issues in a community pharmacy.

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  • 1University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. william-doucette@uiowa.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to characterize comprehensive medication therapy management (MTM) involving a community pharmacy and local physicians by describing the drug-related issues encountered, identifying which medication types were associated with these issues, and listing the actions taken by physicians and pharmacists to address them.

METHODS:

In the MTM program studied, community pharmacists and physicians worked together to manage the drug therapy of ambulatory Iowa Medicaid recipients dispensed > or =4 medications for chronic conditions by a community pharmacy. After initial assessment, pharmacists made written recommendations to the patient's physician, and the physicians subsequently responded. Data were extracted from pharmacy records for patients who made > or =1 visit during the first 2 years of the program. Collected data included patient demographics, number of chronic conditions and medications at enrollment, type and number of drug-related issues, medication category, pharmacist recommendations, and physician acceptance of recommendations.

RESULTS:

Data were gathered for 150 patients. The mean (SD) age was 54.4 (19.4) years and 74.0% were female. They were taking a mean (SD) of 9.3 (4.6) medications and had a mean (SD) of 6.1 (3.1) medical conditions at enrollment. A total of 886 drug-related issues were classified into 7 categories: inappropriate adherence (25.9%), needs additional therapy (22.0%), wrong drug (13.2%), unnecessary drug therapy (12.9%), adverse drug reaction (11.1%), dose too low (9.7%), and dose too high (5.3%). Overall, physicians accepted 313 (47.4%) of the 659 recommendations to alter drug therapy made by pharmacists, with the highest rates of agreement to stop or change a medication (50.3% and 50.0%, respectively) and the lowest rate of agreement to start a new medication (41.7%).

CONCLUSION:

The MTM program showed that drug therapy for ambulatory patients taking multiple medications to treat chronic conditions can be improved through collaboration between physicians and community pharmacists.

PMID:
16154490
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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