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Pediatrics. 2005 Sep;116(3):e393-6.

An epidemiologic study of irritable bowel syndrome in adolescents and children in China: a school-based study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Gastroenterology, Putuo Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China. liudong7050@sina.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To explore the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and its distribution characteristics of adolescents and children in China and its contributing factors.

METHODS:

This study was a stratified, randomized study by clustering samples, which involved 5403 students whose age range was 6 to 18 years from 9 schools, and was conducted in Heilongjiang Province and Shanghai. All students studied were requested to fill in a questionnaire. IBS was diagnosed according to Rome II criteria.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of IBS according to Rome II criteria in adolescents and children in China was 13.25%. The ratio of boys to girls was 1:1.8. There was a higher prevalence (14.02%) of IBS in Heilongjiang province than that (11.72%) in Shanghai. The prevalence in children 12 years and younger was not statistically significantly higher than that of adolescents 13 years and older (11.86% and 11.44%, respectively). The prevalence of IBS in minority students (21.15%) was not statistically significantly higher than that in Han race students (16.08%). Our study indicated that psychological factors, food habit, bad exterior environment, personal habits, and family conditions might be important contributing factors, and exposure to coldness (odds ratio: 2.83) is most prominent.

CONCLUSION:

IBS was a common disorder in adolescents and children in China. The prevalence of IBS in adolescents and children was different in different geographic areas. Our study indicated that IBS in adolescents and children might have possible relations with psychological factors, food habit, bad exterior environment, and family condition.

PMID:
16140684
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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