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Ophthalmology. 2005 Oct;112(10):1734-46.

Three-dimensional retinal imaging with high-speed ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography.

Author information

  • 1Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To demonstrate high-speed, ultrahigh-resolution, 3-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D OCT) and new protocols for retinal imaging.

METHODS:

Ultrahigh-resolution OCT using broadband light sources achieves axial image resolutions of approximately 2 microm compared with standard 10-microm-resolution OCT current commercial instruments. High-speed OCT using spectral/Fourier domain detection enables dramatic increases in imaging speeds. Three-dimensional OCT retinal imaging is performed in normal human subjects using high-speed ultrahigh-resolution OCT. Three-dimensional OCT data of the macula and optic disc are acquired using a dense raster scan pattern. New processing and display methods for generating virtual OCT fundus images; cross-sectional OCT images with arbitrary orientations; quantitative maps of retinal, nerve fiber layer, and other intraretinal layer thicknesses; and optic nerve head topographic parameters are demonstrated.

RESULTS:

Three-dimensional OCT imaging enables new imaging protocols that improve visualization and mapping of retinal microstructure. An OCT fundus image can be generated directly from the 3D OCT data, which enables precise and repeatable registration of cross-sectional OCT images and thickness maps with fundus features. Optical coherence tomography images with arbitrary orientations, such as circumpapillary scans, can be generated from 3D OCT data. Mapping of total retinal thickness and thicknesses of the nerve fiber layer, photoreceptor layer, and other intraretinal layers is demonstrated. Measurement of optic nerve head topography and disc parameters is also possible. Three-dimensional OCT enables measurements that are similar to those of standard instruments, including the StratusOCT, GDx, HRT, and RTA.

CONCLUSION:

Three-dimensional OCT imaging can be performed using high-speed ultrahigh-resolution OCT. Three-dimensional OCT provides comprehensive visualization and mapping of retinal microstructures. The high data acquisition speeds enable high-density data sets with large numbers of transverse positions on the retina, which reduces the possibility of missing focal pathologies. In addition to providing image information such as OCT cross-sectional images, OCT fundus images, and 3D rendering, quantitative measurement and mapping of intraretinal layer thickness and topographic features of the optic disc are possible. We hope that 3D OCT imaging may help to elucidate the structural changes associated with retinal disease as well as improve early diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression and response to treatment.

PMID:
16140383
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1939719
Free PMC Article

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