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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Sep 6;46(5):821-6.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers for prevention of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Author information

  • 1Mid America Heart Institute, Cardiovascular Consultants, Kansas City, Missouri 64111, USA. abuissah@umkc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to investigate the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in preventing the new onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

BACKGROUND:

Diabetes is a public health problem of epidemic proportions and its prevalence is on the rise. The typical American born today has a one in three chance of developing type 2 diabetes. This diagnosis is associated with an adverse cardiovascular prognosis and is considered the risk equivalent of established coronary disease. Even in high-risk individuals, diabetes is a preventable disease. Several studies have shown that ACE inhibitors and ARBs decrease the incidence of new-onset type 2 diabetes. However, the exact role of these agents in diabetes prevention has not yet been fully elucidated.

METHODS:

We conducted a meta-analysis of 12 randomized controlled clinical trials of ACE inhibitors or ARBs, identified through a MEDLINE search and a review of reports from scientific meetings, to study the efficacy of these medications in diabetes prevention.

RESULTS:

This showed that ACE inhibitors and ARBs were associated with reductions in the incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes by 27% and 23%, respectively, and by 25% in the pooled analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of an ACE inhibitor or ARB should be considered in patients with pre-diabetic conditions such as metabolic syndrome, hypertension, impaired fasting glucose, family history of diabetes, obesity, congestive heart failure, or coronary heart disease.

Comment in

PMID:
16139131
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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