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Health Aff (Millwood). 2005 Jul-Aug;24(4):903-14.

Health spending in the United States and the rest of the industrialized world.

Author information

  • 1Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Health Policy and Management, MD, USA. ganderso@jhsph.edu

Abstract

U.S. citizens spent $5,267 per capita for health care in 2002--53 percent more than any other country. Two possible reasons for the differential are supply constraints that create waiting lists in other countries and the level of malpractice litigation and defensive medicine in the United States. Services that typically have queues in other countries account for only 3 percent of U.S. health spending. The cost of defending U.S. malpractice claims is estimated at $6.5 billion in 2001, only 0.46 percent of total health spending. The two most important reasons for higher U.S. spending appear to be higher incomes and higher medical care prices.

Comment in

  • Juries versus judges. [Health Aff (Millwood). 2005]
  • U.S. and U.K. health spending. [Health Aff (Millwood). 2005]
PMID:
16136632
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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