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Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2005 Sep-Oct;30(5):422-8.

Identifying neuropathic pain among patients with chronic low-back pain: use of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale.

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  • 1Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah 21461, Saudi Arabia. amkaki@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Although the literature contains information about prevalence and incidence of low-back pain (LBP), little information is available about the contribution of the neuropathic element to LBP. Our study was designed to investigate the prevalence of neuropathic pain among a sample of chronic LBP patients in Saudi Arabia by use of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) pain scale.

METHODS:

A total of 1,169 patients from 117 centers agreed to participate in the study over a period of 6.5 months. The LANSS pain scale was applied to each patient in an interview format. The characteristics of pain and sensory dysfunction were tested and recorded.

RESULTS:

According to the LANSS pain scale, 639 patients (54.7%) had scores of 12 points or more, which suggested a neuropathic type of pain, and 530 patients (45.3%) had scores of less than 12, which suggested a nociceptive type of pain. Factors that are associated with neuropathic pain are advanced age, female gender, increased height, white race, hypertension and diabetes, a history of smoking, previous back surgery, and previous medications.

CONCLUSION:

Neuropathic pain is a major contributor to chronic LBP, and the LANSS pain scale is a useful tool to distinguish patients with neuropathic pain from those with nociceptive pain.

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PMID:
16135345
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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