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J Pediatr. 2005 Aug;147(2):233-8.

The prevalence of ibuprofen-sensitive asthma in children: a randomized controlled bronchoprovocation challenge study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98105, USA. jason.debley@seattlechildrens.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of ibuprofen-sensitive asthma in school-aged children with mild or moderate persistent asthma.

STUDY DESIGN:

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover bronchoprovocation challenge study in children 6 to 18 years of age with mild or moderate persistent asthma. Patients received a single dose of ibuprofen or placebo, per randomization, and then returned 2 to 7 days later to repeat the procedures after taking that study drug not received at the first visit. At each visit, patients performed spirometry before and (1/2), 1, 2, and 4 hours after administration of study drug. We defined bronchospasm as a > or =20% decrease from baseline in the forced expired volume in the first second (FEV1) and ibuprofen sensitivity as bronchospasm following administration of ibuprofen but not placebo.

RESULTS:

Of the 127 patients screened, 100 (mean age, 11 years) completed the study. Two patients met criteria for ibuprofen-sensitive asthma, resulting in a prevalence of 2% (95% CI: 0.2%-7%). Neither patient was known to have had any exposure to ibuprofen before the study.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of ibuprofen-sensitive asthma was low but non-zero in this group of children with mild or moderate asthma. The possibility of ibuprofen-induced bronchospasm should be considered before administering ibuprofen to children with asthma.

PMID:
16126056
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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