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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;60(1):92-103.

Obesity prevention in low socioeconomic status urban African-american adolescents: study design and preliminary findings of the HEALTH-KIDS Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Human Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. ywang@jhsph.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Obesity prevention among children and adolescents is a public health priority; however, limited school-based intervention trials targeting obesity have been conducted. This article provides an overview of the study design and baseline preliminary findings of our ongoing school-based intervention study.

DESIGN:

Randomized intervention trial to test a school-based, environmental obesity prevention program in urban low socioeconomic status (SES) African-American adolescents. The intervention program was developed based on several behavioral theories and was guided by preliminary findings based on focus group discussion and baseline data.

SETTING:

Four Chicago public schools in the US.

SUBJECTS:

Over 450 5-7th graders and their families and schools were involved.

RESULTS:

Our baseline data indicate a high prevalence of overweight (43% in boys and 41% in girls) and a number of problems in these children's physical activity and eating patterns. Only 26% reported spending > or = 20 min engaged in vigorous-moderate exercise in > or = 5 days over the past 7 days; 29% reported spending > or = 5 h each day watching TV, playing video games, or using computer. They also consumed too many fried foods and soft drinks. On average, 55% consumed fried foods > or = 2 times/day over the past 7 days; regarding soft drinks, 70% reported consuming > or = 2 times/day.

CONCLUSION:

School-based obesity prevention programs are urgently needed in the target US urban, low SES, minority communities. These data can be used to inform intervention activities.

PMID:
16118646
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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