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Diabet Med. 2005 Sep;22(9):1267-71.

Diabetes and hypertension in pregnancy in a rural community of Bangladesh: a population-based study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Community Medicine, Ibrahim Medical College, Segunbagicha, Dhaka, Bangladesh. sayeedma@dab-bd.org

Abstract

AIMS:

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with increased infant mortality. Diabetes and infant mortality is higher in Bangladesh but the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in pregnancy is not known. Thus, this study addressed the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in pregnancy.

METHODS:

We selected 10 villages randomly in a union council of Nandail subdistrict. Following a population census (n = 14 382: male/female = 7476/6906) on demography and marital status, we interviewed 2205 married women (18-44 years) for detection of pregnancy. Of a total of 172 pregnancies, we investigated 147 with a gestational age of 24-28 weeks for obstetrical history, clinical examination and blood pressure (BP). Fasting (FBG) and 2-h blood glucose (2hBG) were assessed by Hemocue cuvette. WHO diagnostic criteria were used.

RESULTS:

The overall prevalence (95% CI) of diabetes was 6.8% (1.88-9.32) and 8.2% (3.74-12.64) according to FBG and 2hBG, respectively. The crude prevalence of systolic and diastolic hypertension was 6.8 and 5.4%, respectively. The median (interquartile range) values for age, BMI and FBG of the participants were 25.0 (21.0-30.0) years, 19.5 (18.2-21.2) and 3.9 (3.6-4.3), respectively. The history of abortion, neonatal death and stillbirth was found in 19.9, 11.4 and 9.6%, respectively. The prevalence of GDM was higher among those with the history of stillbirth (15.4 vs. 6.0%) and neonatal death (11.8 vs. 6.2%) than those without.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of GDM in rural Bangladesh is comparable with any other population with higher prevalence of GDM. Increased morbidity and mortality among mothers and newborns in Bangladesh may, in part, be because of increased prevalence of GDM.

PMID:
16108860
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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