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Am J Public Health. 2005 Sep;95(9):1623-30. Epub 2005 Jul 28.

Associations between obesity and receipt of screening mammography, Papanicolaou tests, and influenza vaccination: results from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) Study.

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  • 1Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. truls.ostbye@duke.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Obese Americans, who receive more care for chronic diseases, may receive fewer preventive services. We evaluated the association between body mass index (BMI) and receipt of screening mammography and Papanicolaou tests among middle-aged women and the association between BMI and receipt of influenza vaccination among the elderly.

METHODS:

We analyzed 2 datasets: the Health and Retirement Study (4439 women aged 50-61 years) and the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) Study (4045 women and 2154 men aged 70 years or more).

RESULTS:

When BMI was greater than 18.5 kg/m2, we found an inverse dose-response relationship between BMI and receipt of screening mammography and Pap tests among White, but not Black, middle-aged women. We found a similar association between BMI and influenza vaccination among the elderly.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher BMI was associated with less frequent receipt of preventive services among middle-aged White women and elderly White women and men. The Healthy People 2010 clinical preventive service goals remain elusive, especially for overweight and obese White persons.

PMID:
16051935
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1449407
Free PMC Article
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