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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2006 Feb;63(2):313-7.

Health effects in children aged 3-6 years induced by environmental lead exposure.

Author information

  • 1Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People's Republic of China. jinyp@mail.cmu.edu.cn

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the involvement of oxidative damage in lead-induced toxicity in children aged 3-6 years and to enlighten whether oxidative stress indicators are correlated with the known indices of lead toxicity.

METHODS:

Blood samples were collected from 408 subjects (217 boys and 191 girls) in the urban kindergartens. The age range of the subjects was 3-6 years. Blood lead levels (BLLs) were analyzed by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and contents of glutathione (GSH) in erythrocyte and levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) were analyzed spectrophotometrically in these children.

RESULTS:

Children with BLLs >or = 100 microg/L had significantly decreased erythrocyte ALAD activities and increased plasma MDA levels compared to the children with BLLs < 100 microg/L. No significant changes were observed in erythrocyte SOD and GSH-Px activities and GSH levels associated with elevated BLLs in these children.

CONCLUSION:

Present data indicate that oxidative damage could be induced by lead in children with BLLs > or = 100 microg/L, and this may partly be attributed to the inhibited ALAD activities. Statistically significant changes of oxidative stress parameters in preschool children while BLLs were more than 100 microg/L could be implicated that oxidative damage might contribute to lead-induced intellectual impairment.

PMID:
16045986
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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