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Neuropharmacology. 2005 Dec;49(7):1067-76. Epub 2005 Jul 22.

Hippocampal dopamine receptors modulate cFos expression in the rat nucleus accumbens evoked by chemical stimulation of the ventral hippocampus.

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  • 1Department de Farmàcia i Tecnología Farmacèutica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de València, Avda Vicente Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia, Spain.

Abstract

Recently, we have shown that D1 and D2 receptors in the ventral hippocampus (VH) modulate both the locomotor activation and the increase in dopamine (DA) levels in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc) induced by NMDA stimulation of the VH. In the present study we analyze the possible role of VH D1 and D2 receptors in the modulation of the cFos expression in NAc (core and shell subregions) and in dorsal striatum. This was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis of cFos expression in the rat brains after retro-dialysis application of NMDA (50mM, 10 min) into VH, in absence and in presence of either the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (100 and 250 microM, 60 min) or the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride (100 and 250 microM, 60 min). NMDA induced a robust increase in the cFos expression in the NAc shell, both in the ipsilateral and contralateral side. No statistically significant increases were observed in the NAc core and in the dorsal striatum. Simultaneous application of SCH 23390 and NMDA into the VH attenuated the NMDA-evoked cFos expression in NAc shell. In contrast, raclopride had no significant effect. Our present results show that the NMDA receptor mediated effects in the VH require D1 receptors and suggest that DA in VH strongly modulates the excitatory outputs from this brain area.

PMID:
16040065
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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