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Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 Aug;84(8):767-72.

Long-term efficacy of Burch colposuspension: a 14-year follow-up study.

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  • 1Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, 581-85 Linköping, Sweden. preben.kjolhede@lio.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study is to investigate the long-term efficacy of the Burch colposuspension and to analyze the risk factors for an unsuccessful outcome at the long-term follow-up of more than 10 years.

METHODS:

Data from patient files of 190 women on whom surgery was performed with Burch colposuspension during 1980-1988 and answers from a postal questionnaire performed median 14 years after the Burch colposuspension concerning the lower urinary tract function were retrieved retrospectively.

RESULTS:

Subjectively significant urinary incontinence was experienced by 56% of the responders. Only 19% reported no incontinence episodes. Among the significant urinary incontinent women, symptoms of stress incontinence occurred in 26%, urge incontinence in 17%, and mixed incontinence in 42%. In 15%, the symptom of incontinence was atypical and could not be categorized. Feeling of incomplete bladder emptying post-operatively and pre-operative obesity was associated with the long-term outcome of Burch colposuspension (odds ratio (OR) = 2.33; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.20-4.54 and OR = 2.52; 95% CI = 1.10-5.77, respectively). Age, obesity at the long-term follow-up or having had surgery for fecal incontinence, genital prolapse, or hysterectomy were not significantly associated with the outcome of the Burch colposuspension.

CONCLUSIONS:

The subjective cure rate decreases with time after Burch colposuspension. Lower urinary tract symptoms are very common at the long-term after Burch colposuspension with more than three-fourth experiencing these. Feeling of incomplete bladder emptying post-operatively and pre-operative obesity seem to be long-term risk factors for an adverse outcome. A standard definition for follow-up periods is suggested.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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