Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Oct 15;58(8):668-76. Epub 2005 Jul 14.

The prevalence and correlates of nonaffective psychosis in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R).

Author information

  • 1Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, 180 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. kessler@hcp.med.harvard.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To estimate the prevalence and correlates of clinician-diagnosed DSM-IV nonaffective psychosis (NAP) in a national household survey.

METHODS:

Data came from the United States National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). A screen for NAP was followed by blinded sub-sample clinical reappraisal interviews. Logistic regression was used to impute clinical diagnoses to respondents who were not re-interviewed. The method of Multiple Imputation (MI) was used to estimate prevalence and correlates.

RESULTS:

Clinician-diagnosed NAP was well predicted by the screen (area under the curve [AUC] = .80). The MI prevalence estimate of NAP (standard error in parentheses) is 5.0 (2.6) per 1000 population lifetime and 3.0 (2.2) per 1000 past 12 months. The vast majority (79.4%) of lifetime and 12-month (63.7%) cases met criteria for other DSM-IV hierarchy-free disorders. Fifty-eight percent of 12-month cases were in treatment, most in the mental health specialty sector.

CONCLUSIONS:

The screen for NAP in the NCS-R greatly improved on previous epidemiological surveys in reducing false positives, but coding of open-ended screening scale responses was still needed to achieve accurate prediction. The lower prevalence estimate than in total-population incidence studies raises concerns that systematic nonresponse bias causes downward bias in survey prevalence estimates of NAP.

PMID:
16023620
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2847859
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk