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Pediatrics. 2005 Aug;116(2):e221-8. Epub 2005 Jul 1.

Lactobacillus paracasei strain ST11 has no effect on rotavirus but ameliorates the outcome of nonrotavirus diarrhea in children from Bangladesh.

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  • 1International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Centre for Health and Population Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh. sasarker@icddrb.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have shown that selected strains of lactobacilli that are administered orally result in a modest reduction of diarrhea duration. However, duration alone is not considered optimal for therapeutic evaluation of any agent in diarrhea.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effect of a new probiotic, Lactobacillus paracasei strain ST11 (ST11), in acute childhood diarrhea by using evaluation criteria recommended by the World Health Organization.

METHODS:

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 230 male infants and young children, 4 to 24 months of age, presenting with diarrhea of <2 days' duration were admitted to the metabolic research ward of the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh, and fed 10(10) colony-forming units of lyophilized ST11 or placebo daily for 5 days. Stool output and frequency, oral rehydration solution intake, and excretion of rotavirus were monitored daily.

RESULTS:

No effect of ST11 treatment on severe rotavirus diarrhea was observed. However, the probiotic treatment did significantly reduce cumulative stool output (225 +/- 218 vs 381 +/- 240 mL/kg), stool frequency (27.9 +/- 17 vs 42.5 +/- 26), and oral rehydration solution intake (180 +/- 207 vs 331 +/- 236 mL/kg) in children with less-severe nonrotavirus diarrhea compared with those receiving placebo treatment. A significantly higher proportion of nonrotavirus children receiving ST11 had their diarrhea resolve within 6 days of therapy (ST11 versus placebo: 76% vs 49%).

CONCLUSIONS:

ST11 has a clinically significant benefit in the management of children with nonrotavirus-induced diarrhea, but it is ineffective in those with rotavirus diarrhea.

PMID:
15995003
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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